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Author Topic: Lunarpages Speed Test  (Read 128226 times)

Offline Jay

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Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #30 on: April 14, 2005, 09:40:14 AM »
chaos1105, Yessir I dooooo!

it's awesome for the most part :)

Do you have the same?

- Jay

Offline GMTurner

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Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2005, 04:31:43 AM »
Just stumbled across this speed test while troubleshooting some connection issues with my new cable modem connection...

http://www.toast.net/performance/

LunarPages is the 5th Web Host listed on the left....
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Offline strewth

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #32 on: August 15, 2005, 04:18:20 AM »
... hmmm, I've got a 1.5Mbps down line terminating on the other side of the planet in rural Australia so an average of 16.KBps (bytes) ain't bad as "save as"... even better when I opened up say 5 streams in flashget and got 83KBps.  :thumb:

Offline ZeroMage

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #33 on: October 01, 2005, 03:45:58 AM »
Very impressed,
I was able to get speeds of about 3200kb/sec (3.2 MB /sec) to the T3 at the company I work for.
1500kb/sec to my Shell that my ISP provides,

just nearly under 5000kb/sec on a shell in Texas. 

Pretty fast. :)

Offline biggunz

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2005, 02:58:37 AM »
wow I got pretty good speed.  :thumb:

Offline blackfoxz

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #35 on: November 10, 2005, 09:20:20 AM »
I'm on a 10mcable connection
I did the 50MB files...both hovered at 15-22kb/sf.
Is this good for a cable connection?
I'm form China

Offline jrtalon

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #36 on: November 26, 2005, 06:57:20 PM »
I'm only getting 70kb/s  :?   I'm on a comcast 6mb connection from New Jersey.

Offline GMTurner

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2005, 09:54:13 PM »
heavy traffic on the 'net this weekend... everyone off work and playing on-line during the holiday? one possibility at least...  a tracert might be good to see where the slow down might be happening...

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Offline garrondelonbailey

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #38 on: November 30, 2005, 12:14:30 PM »
100MB test not done yet but, looks like it is going to come in at around 120 KB/sec.  Not my set up but, will be using it for a while -- South Central Bell DSL.

Off anyone's cuff -- Should I spend time researching / tweaking?  I remember far better performance with cable.  What little time I have "owned" DSL in the past, I can not remember  being satisfied -- much less, impressed.

thanks,
  -- garron

Offline Sloth_Boy

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #39 on: December 04, 2005, 03:56:11 PM »
I only got between 70-80kb/s on my 1.5mbs dsl. that less than half my max pseed, im in australia by the way, soooo

Offline Jez

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #40 on: December 29, 2005, 02:08:38 AM »
I get 73 - 75 kByte/sec when downloading the 100MB file.

I'm in Jerusalem, Israel currently enjoying a 1.5MB DSL connection.

Happy Holidays,

Jez
« Last Edit: December 29, 2005, 02:11:59 AM by Jez »

Offline Rick_E

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #41 on: December 30, 2005, 01:01:31 PM »
Just to note that download speeds are often given in KiloBytes per second, while ISP speeds are usually given in kilobits per second.

To get the approximate kbps you need to multiply KB/second by nine. For example 75 KB/sec download speed  x 9 = 675 kbits per second.

Using another example, a 1.5 mbps DSL service would deliver about a 167 KB/second download speed.
All the best, Rick E

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Offline Nibbler

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #42 on: December 30, 2005, 01:07:56 PM »
There are 8 bits in a byte though (4 in a nibble :)).
Missing since 1983


Offline Rick_E

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #43 on: December 30, 2005, 03:26:28 PM »
Yes I believe it's 8 bits in a byte but also 1 extra parity bit to ensure accuracy during transmission, but I may be mistaken.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2005, 03:28:30 PM by Rick_E »
All the best, Rick E

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Offline JimBrown

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Re: Testing Lunarpages download speed.
« Reply #44 on: December 31, 2005, 07:14:58 AM »
If I recall correctly, broadband protocols, such as Ethernet, do not use parity bits. Those are used by telephone modems.

However, in the TCP/IP protocol there is other overhead, such as the packet headers. For TCP it is usually 20 bytes per packet. Add to that the IP header which is also usually 20 bytes.

Then there is the transmission protocol, such as Ethernet, which also adds its own headers (12 at the front, 4 at the end.) The 4 at the end is a CRC value, which is where the error checking takes place.

The usual broadband maximum transmission unit (MTU) for TCP/IP is 1500 bytes, which consists of the TCP header, 20 bytes, the IP header, 20 bytes and the payload, 1460 bytes. Ethernet adds 16 bytes for a total of 1516 bytes travelling the wire.

That means, under ideal conditions, the maximum speed that data that can be transferred is 96.3 percent of the bandwidth.

Using base 2 for the math, a 1mbps connection (1048576 bits per second) can (again, under ideal conditions) transfer a maximum of 123.26 KB/s.

1048576 / 8 * .963 / 1024

A 5mbps connection would have a maximum transfer rate of 616.32 KB/s.

Of course, there are other factors that will slow down the transfer, such as latency, resending bad packets, etc.

...jim

 

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