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Author Topic: what is Vector Graphics?  (Read 18848 times)

Offline noahwilson

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what is Vector Graphics?
« on: May 22, 2013, 05:04:42 AM »
Hello Guys,
I am new in web designing and i have no more knowledge of this field so tell what is Vector Graphics? share your feedback.
Thanks.

Offline MrPhil

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2013, 05:19:59 AM »
Raster graphics (such as in Photoshop, GIMP, etc.) are a grid of pixels. Their main problem is that they do not scale up and down very well, without losing a lot of information. These include GIF, JPEG, PNG, TIFF, and most other image formats. Vector graphics (e.g., SVG) use an arbitrary coordinate grid to draw lines between any two points, and then map it to the desired resolution and size of pixels without any loss of information. Vector graphics take a lot more work to fill an area or to do gradations of color or shade. Their chief advantage over raster (pixel-based) formats is that they scale up or down perfectly, as far as you want to go without permanent loss of detail, and can be noticeably smaller (file sizes). The chief disadvantage is that the rendering load is generally placed on the browser, and may have to be repeated each time the image is displayed.

Note that vector graphics are no good for photographs. They are better for diagrams, charts, etc., where you have well-defined lines on solid colors, possibly with well-defined gradients. If the user will be viewing diagrams and wishes to zoom in and out, a browser-based rendering of SVG may be the answer. If the diagram or chart data is frequently updated, vector graphics avoid having to regenerate a raster image on the server each time.

Also note that if you are looking at vector graphics to replace JPEG for diagrams and charts, because of the noticeable artifacts near color boundaries, that GIF may be better choice (lossless compression is used, which doesn't introduce compression artifacts). JPEG uses lossy compression, which tends to introduce artifacts due to the discarding of high-frequency information during compression.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2013, 11:40:37 AM by MrPhil »
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Offline Nepster Martin

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2013, 12:12:50 AM »
Vector graphic is constructed by the use of points, lines, curves, shapes and polygon. These all are depended on mathematical expressions to create images in computer graphic. Main benefit of vector graphic is you can zoom any size nothing difference in original image because it is not being by pixels.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2013, 12:15:22 AM by Nepster Martin »

Offline Lalithya

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2013, 06:04:24 AM »
Adobe Illustrator is a vector graphics editor that which will become your key decision to express yourself through artistic manipulations with images.

Offline rahulvyas

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2014, 09:53:56 PM »
Vector graphics use mathematical formulas to create shapes, points, lines and curves. The most advantages of vector graphics is can be resized and stretched. Not only that, they look better on devices with advanced resolutions whereas raster images become visible on the same quality regardless of resolution.

Offline jayanta1

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2014, 10:23:41 PM »
Vector graphics is the creation of digital images through a sequence of commands or mathematical statements that place lines and shapes in a given two-dimensional or three-dimensional space.  It is actually a collection of different objects rather than using an exact picture. It is basically composed of points or dots and then anchored together to create a masterpiece.

Offline MrPhil

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2014, 09:12:12 AM »
Quote
Their main problem is that they do not scale up and down very well, without losing a lot of information.

Sorry to bump this up but over the years, were there any recent changes that can do a work around for this already?

Of course not. It's the very nature of pixel-based graphics (non-vector) that they don't scale well. It's the nature of the beast. Vector graphics scale well, and can be smaller to transmit, but throw the rendering burden on the browser. It's always a tradeoff.
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Offline explorequotes

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2015, 12:02:41 AM »
Vector graphics is the use of geometrical primitives such as points, lines, curves, and shapes or polygons—all of which are based on mathematical expressions—to represent images in computer graphics.

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« Last Edit: February 17, 2015, 07:10:26 AM by MrPhil »

Offline mithcd

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2015, 08:55:55 AM »
Just a quick one please. What are the determining factors where users must use Vector Graphics on our site?

Offline MrPhil

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Re: what is Vector Graphics?
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2015, 09:20:32 AM »
Nothing requires that you must use VG on a site. If you need to generate GIF, JPEG, PNG, etc. images on the fly, all have libraries for common languages, but it might be easier to use something like SVG. Keep in mind that VGs are unsuitable for photos and other detailed images (containing shade gradiations, etc.). VGs are used only if the image can be simply described with certain simple mathematical constructs, and especially if it is to be displayed over a wide range of sizes. If there is a great deal of detail, a bitmapped image (GIF, etc.) may result in a smaller file (faster transmission and display). Don't use JPEG except for photos, as its lossy compression will introduce annoying artifacts near edges.
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